Author: Christof Schöch

0

Out now: French Literary Studies and the Digital Paradigm Shift

In what seems like a distant past, that is in september 2012, Lars Schneider and me organized a two-day session at the bi-annual conference of the German French Scholars’ Association in Leipzig (Frankoromanistenkongress; website no longer available!). The other day, the proceedings finally came out and we are of course very happy and proud. Just because it is digital doesn’t...

2

Topic Modeling French Crime Fiction

For some reason I can’t explain, I have had for many years a very keen interest in crime fiction, especially French crime fiction written since the 1950s, roughly. Some of my favorite authors are Léo Malet, Jean-Patrick Manchette, Sébastien Japrisot and Didier Daeninckx. And it is not for no reason that I was drawn to Mitzi Morris’ stylometric murder mystery...

1

Principal Component Analysis for Literary Genre Stylistics

Last week, we had our little digital humanities conference here in Würzburg, called <philtag n=”11″/> because this was the eleventh annual edition of the event. It was a great event, with plenty of wonderful talks about digital editing of manuscripts, immersive virtual reality, 3D laser-scans of cuneiform writing, network analysis of drama, and a lot more. For me, it was...

7

Big? Smart? Clean? Messy? Data in the Humanities

(Please note that a revised version of this post has been published in the Journal for Digital Humanities in december 2013. – The original post is a slightly edited version of a talk I gave at the European Summer School “Culture & Technology at the University of Leipzig, Germany, on July 26 2013.) This talk is about data in the...

0

My DH2013 program, possibly

The Digital Humanities Conference 2013 in Lincoln, Nebraska will start very soon. The program is packed with long and short talks and panel sessions in six parallel tracks, and of course the whole breadth of DH is represented. But computational text analysis seems to be one of the major topics again, after it was so prominent last year at DH2012...

12

What the perfect repository for text analysis looks like (to me)

The longer I work with various collections of literary texts, available in various formats, and for use with various tools, the more I would like to have a nice repository which me and others could use to ingest, store, transform, update and extract text collections. So what would this repository look like? Basically, I’m describing a use case, and would...

0

Annotation, or: it doesn’t always have to be quantitative analysis

Up to now – and this means for its first year, my first post here dating from 12 months ago – this blog has been primarily concerned, with respect to text analysis, with quantitative approaches. However, this is of course only one part of computational text analysis, and computationally supported manual annotation of texts is another one. This is what...

0

Getting a closer look: More on visualizing results from stylometry with Gephi

This post is a follow-up post to my last brief post on the new version of the stylo script and its output for visualization with Gephi. Today, I just want to report on what Maciej told me about the technical details, and to show some more graphs resulting from my data. First things first, then. Here is how the data for...

1

Connecting our Tools, or: Stylometry and Network Analysis made easy

Do you like stylometry, and maybe have tried out the scripts for R provided by the Computational Stylistics Group? And do you like visualisation, and maybe have played around a bit with Gephi, the network visualisation tool? I suppose it’s rather likely that you have, as a reader of this blog, or at least that your interested in this kind...

2

Catching up: “Statistics: Making Sense of Data” on Coursera

When you’re trying to figure out how best to use all these wonderful tools we now have for the computational analysis of literary texts (such as the stylometry scripts, MALLET, WEKA, and many more), you tend to get into situations where you wish your knowledge in statistics was more solid, recent, broad, and thorough. (I did study psychology as a...

0

Enhancement, Transformation, and Zukunftsmusik: Established methods of interpretation transposed into the computational realm.

One of my favorite literary genres is French twentieth-century crime fiction, roughly from the 1930s (Georges Simenon) via the 1950s (Léo Malet) to the 1970s (Jean-Patrick Manchette). This is quite a large area, so one of the things I would like to do, if the state of text digitization and copyright law will permit it some day, is to do...

0

Busy times, and some light at the horizon

Lot’s of things have been going on over these last weeks. Some of them were related to text analysis, others were rather related to job interviews, grant writing, teaching, real work, and travel, and I was just too busy to write anything here. Instead of a “real” post, this is just a way for me to cover the ground and...

3

A Stylometric Murder Mystery, or: Poetic Justice by Mitzi Morris (Computers and Literature in Fiction, 3)

It is high time to talk about Poetic Justice by Mitzi Morris, the recent stylometric mystery novel I have been promising to write about in my post on Amanda Crosses Poetic Justice, also in the series on Computers and Literature in Fiction. (Sorry for not linking to the place where you can buy the book, but it’s already bad enough...

Clickstream Data Yields High-Resolution Maps of Science 3

Heterogeneous Humanities, or: Do the Digital Humanities work in a “Mode 2” way of knowledge production?

For a while now, I have been wondering how working with digital data, tools and methods changes the way we work in the humanities. Qualitative tagging of literary phenomena leads to a formalization of them and to the ability to model complex phenomena, for example. And quantitative text analysis can give us a much more distant and broader view of...