Tagged: digital humanities

Topic Clustering Dendrogram 0

What’s in my topic model? Or: Clustering topics by semantic similarity

For the last year or so, one my major interests has been topic modeling and applying it to a variety of French literary texts. I have been doing this as part of an exploration of the computational analysis of literary genres in our Würzburg junior researchers group. One of the interesting things to come out of all of this has...

0

Of the Digital Humanities considered as a Jazz ensemble

We frequently speak of Digital Humanities projects – in which people from one or several disciplines such as literary studies, musicology and/or art history work together with colleagues from computer science and/or statistics – using concepts like inter- or transdisciplinarity or like collaboration.[1] The danger, we quickly notice, lies in the “divison of labor” such arrangements imply. Such division of...

0

Out now: French Literary Studies and the Digital Paradigm Shift

In what seems like a distant past, that is in september 2012, Lars Schneider and me organized a two-day session at the bi-annual conference of the German French Scholars’ Association in Leipzig (Frankoromanistenkongress; website no longer available!). The other day, the proceedings finally came out and we are of course very happy and proud. Just because it is digital doesn’t...

Clickstream Data Yields High-Resolution Maps of Science 3

Heterogeneous Humanities, or: Do the Digital Humanities work in a “Mode 2” way of knowledge production?

For a while now, I have been wondering how working with digital data, tools and methods changes the way we work in the humanities. Qualitative tagging of literary phenomena leads to a formalization of them and to the ability to model complex phenomena, for example. And quantitative text analysis can give us a much more distant and broader view of...

1

The Geek’s Quest, or: Mr Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, by Robin Sloan (Computers and Literature in Fiction, 1)

Sure, there have been a few traces of digital humanities and computer-supported literary scholarship in literary texts before, most notably in David Lodge’s wonderful campus novels. There must be more, and maybe some of you can point them out to me. An early example comes from David Lodge’s Changing Places (published in 1975!), which contains an episode where reputed Jane Austen...

0

Bibliography on Text Analysis, particularly Stylometry and Topic Modelling

[Update, 2012-01-28: The bibliography has changed its name, has received a new URL, and has been thoroughly reorganized. All stuff related to text analysis is now in the collection called, well, “Analysis”. The tagging system has been simplified, too.] Release early, release often, and talk about it. Isn’t this one of the credos of the digital humanities? In any case,...

1

Unsupervised relative distances, or supervised clear-cut decisions: more work (or play) with Eder/Rybicky’s stylometry script

The biggest Digital Humanities event of the year is over: DH2012 in Hamburg. And one of the major topics seemed to be, at least from my perspective, stylometry. Several panels and some separate papers were directly concerned with stylometry, during the main conference. I’ll have to postpone more thorough comment on the ones I heard and liked best to another...

The Dragonfly’s Gaze

This blog deals with computational approaches to literary text analysis, i.e. with the exploring, analyzing and interpreting (mostly) literary texts (mostly from European literary traditions) using textual data in digital form, software and services which support or enable such analysis, and various methods supported by software. While the thematic focus is relative narrow, the scope of items to be dealt...