The Dragonfly's Gaze Blog

0

Poetic Justice by Amanda Cross (Computers and Literature in Fiction, 2)

Some time ago, I briefly reported on reading Mr Penumbra’s 24-hour bookstore by Robin Sloan, the recent fantasy-mystery novel in which the contrast between the all-digital and old-style book culture was played out in the most entertaining way. Back then, I was wondering whether there were more such novels about computers and literature, and indeed there are! This time, the...

1

Stylometry, or: from experiments to widened horizons

(Eine deutsche Fassung dieses Beitrags erscheint zeitgleich bei “Philologeek“.) Last week, at the Göttinger philologisches Forum, I had the occasion to report on the current state of my “stylometric experiments” involving above all the relationship between authorship and genre in French classical theater. (I know this sounds like its always the same topic, but I keep making small advances.) Without...

1

The Geek’s Quest, or: Mr Penumbra’s 24-Hour Bookstore, by Robin Sloan (Computers and Literature in Fiction, 1)

Sure, there have been a few traces of digital humanities and computer-supported literary scholarship in literary texts before, most notably in David Lodge’s wonderful campus novels. There must be more, and maybe some of you can point them out to me. An early example comes from David Lodge’s Changing Places (published in 1975!), which contains an episode where reputed Jane Austen...

0

Große Sprünge und konzentrische Ringe, oder: Stephen Ramsay über Daten, Texte, Interpretationen

(The following blog post is in German, because it reflects on an excellent talk by Stephen Ramsay, “Stanley and me“, which most of my readers outside Germany will have read anyway; it has been retweetet thorougly on Twitter and was Digital Humanities Now’s Editor’s Choice some days ago. Sorry folks, but you’re not missing anything.) Ein weit verbreitetes Missverständnis in...

4

Author or genre? Assessing the quality of cluster analysis graphs in two-dimensional classification problems

One of the very fundamental issues in stylometric classification tasks is that the data under scrutiny is usually messy in some way. And I don’t even mean dirty OCR here, which is a problem anyone even casually playing with Google’s N-Gram Viewer and interested in pre-1800s texts will have noticed (Mark Liberman, among others, wrote an interesting piece on this)....

0

Bibliography on Text Analysis, particularly Stylometry and Topic Modelling

[Update, 2012-01-28: The bibliography has changed its name, has received a new URL, and has been thoroughly reorganized. All stuff related to text analysis is now in the collection called, well, “Analysis”. The tagging system has been simplified, too.] Release early, release often, and talk about it. Isn’t this one of the credos of the digital humanities? In any case,...

0

Mining Queneau and the Encyclopédie (or: back from the break)

When I went on a short holiday in August, I did not expect it would be the beginning of such a long break in my blogging activities here. Well, I have been busy! And busy mostly with things that are related less to text analysis and rather to text encoding. (Of course, a blog post in itself would be in...

6

Beyond the black box, or: understanding the difference between various statistical distance measures

One of the issues we noticed time and again when using the different stylometric approches is the huge influence of settings and parameters on the results. This is not surprising, of course, and also does not question the validity of the method as such. Rather, this is the result of the current historical state of stylometry, where research on the...

0

Quick follow-up: of the use of distractors in stylometry

This is just a very quick follow-up post to my last post about the Molière-Corneille problem. There, I had noticed that when trying to make the “stylo” script discriminate between Molière and Corneille’s plays, while there was no overlap between the two plays, there also was no clear separating line between the two groups of plays. The supervised method helped...

1

Unsupervised relative distances, or supervised clear-cut decisions: more work (or play) with Eder/Rybicky’s stylometry script

The biggest Digital Humanities event of the year is over: DH2012 in Hamburg. And one of the major topics seemed to be, at least from my perspective, stylometry. Several panels and some separate papers were directly concerned with stylometry, during the main conference. I’ll have to postpone more thorough comment on the ones I heard and liked best to another...

0

Stylometry in manuscript studies!?

When I signed up for the workshop on “Digital Manuscript Analysis” (organized by the University of Hamburg’s Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures at DH2012), I expected this to be something relatively disconnected from text analysis in literary studies. Author attribution studies as they are being widely practised today are very much focused on transcribed text, which allows to...

0

Taking Eder/Rybicki’s Stylometry Script for a test drive

One of the things I planned to do with this blog is to document my experience with various tools for computational text analysis. This is a way of letting other people know what these tools can do, and what I am currently working on and maybe hear their (your!) thoughts on it; it is also a way of forcing myself...

4

The convergence of the digital and the literary in research: an example

Over the last couple of days, I went to three conferences: two were very clearly on the humanities side of my interests, the first taking place in Berlin and concerning the relations between texts and images, the second one taking place in Mainz, and concerning Rousseau and his literary and intellectual consequences. The third conference was approaching the humanities from...

The Dragonfly’s Gaze

This blog deals with computational approaches to literary text analysis, i.e. with the exploring, analyzing and interpreting (mostly) literary texts (mostly from European literary traditions) using textual data in digital form, software and services which support or enable such analysis, and various methods supported by software. While the thematic focus is relative narrow, the scope of items to be dealt...